Free Film Screening Series: Queer Cinema at QC!

Please join us for Queer Cinema at QC!

We will kick off this monthly film screening series on Wednesday, September 8th, at 6pm with the film Kiki!

“Kiki fluidly combines interviews on-the-street and dance-floor scenes to create an exhilarating, multifaceted portrait of ballroom participants, a number of whom are L.G.B.T. activists. Kiki is also an indelible, must-see ode to gay New York.”
-MANOHLA DARGIS, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Kiki Flyer Fall 2021Join us for a queer flick, some fun and a chance to win a prize!

This film screening is open to everyone on Zoom, but only the first (50) fully vaccinated Queens College students may join us on campus! Masks are required. Seating will be distanced.

Registration Required

At home, or on campus, Kiki is sure to excite and educate!!! Seeya there!

Learn more about LGBTQI+ history by browsing the library’s Queer Collection.

Queer Cinema at QC is made possible because of the generous support of the New York City Council through the office of Daniel Dromm (District 25), the Office of Speaker Corey Johnson, and LaGuardia Community College, in partnership with the Queens College Office of Student Development and Leadership, the Queens College Libraries and The Summit at Queens College. Other sponsors include the Women and Gender Studies Programs at Queens College; the Gender, Love & Sexuality Alliance/GLASA at QC; the CUNY Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives; and the Division of Student Affairs.

Queens College is a proud CUNY LGBTQI+ Consortium member.

Faculty Opportunity: OER Fellowships

The Library welcomes applications for the OER Faculty Fellowship program, now in its fourth year, for the 2021-2022 cohort! Applications are due by August 1, 2021.

Fellows will participate in a four-part seminar series that will guide them through the process of finding, creating, evaluating, and implementing open and/or zero-cost materials for a course that will run in Spring or Fall 2022. The fellowship carries a $2000 stipend for the creation of a single-section course.

Fellowship Requirements

Both full-time and part-time faculty are eligible for the fellowship. Applicants are expected to clear their participation with their department chair prior to applying. If you are interested in converting a course with multiple sections from a pricey textbook to a free, open alternative, please contact Leila Walker at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu prior to applying, as an alternative arrangement involving multiple instructors and course leads may be more appropriate than an individual fellowship.

Faculty fellows commit to:

  • Actively participate in an OER fellowship seminar in Fall 2021, which will consist of four units with synchronous and asynchronous elements
  • Develop a fully OER or ZTC course (materials due January 10, 2022)
    Teach at least one section of the OER or ZTC course in Fall 2021 or Spring 2022
  • Submit course materials to our institutional repository, CUNY Academic Works
  • Write a brief (200-500 word) end-of-fellowship narrative (due June 6, 2022)

Opportunities for Large-Scale Projects

The Library is also interested in partnering with course leads for those courses with multiple sections and high enrollments to develop high-quality course materials at a lower cost. The fellowship would offer training and a $2000 stipend for course leads, as well as a $500 stipend for faculty and adjuncts the first time they teach a section of a course using the zero-textbook-cost materials. We have had several successes with multiple section courses, including the creation of an OER lab manual for Biology under the guidance of Prof. Nathalia Holtzman, and the transition from an expensive homework system to a free, open-source alternative under the guidance of Prof. Chris Hanusa in the Math Department.

More Information

More information about how open educational/zero cost resources support teaching and learning can be found in our Guide to Open Educational Resources and Zero Textbook Cost.

More information about our fellowship program can be found on our OER Faculty Fellowships page!

If faculty have any questions or would like to learn more about OER, they are encouraged to contact our OER coordinator, Dr. Leila Walker, Digital Scholarship Librarian at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu.

Celebrating Diversity: LGBTQ+ Pride Month

To celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride Month in June 2021, the Library is showcasing a research guide on Pride curated by Prof. Leila Walker, Digital Scholarship Librarian, which features ebooks and other e-resources. Check out these resources and join us for a virtual celebration at CUNY Pridefest at Queens College on June 25.

Some History and Background

Each year in June, we celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride and commemorate the June 28, 1969, Stonewall Uprising. At that time, when homosexuality was a criminal offense, the Stonewall Inn was one of the most popular gay bars in New York City, and it was subjected to frequent police raids. In the early hours of June 28, 1969, police raided the bar; the powerful resistance to the raid, the ensuing riots, and the commemoration of the uprising the following June are often considered the origins of the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement.

As a queer woman, Pride month is personal for me. While June is a time to celebrate the joy, pride, power, and diversity of LGBTQ+ people and our history, it can also be a very stressful time of year for many of us. June is the month when we remember the 2016 massacre at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida. June is also the month when Supreme Court decisions are traditionally handed down: in June 2003, the Supreme Court decision in Lawrence v. Texas legalized same-sex sexual activity across the US; in June 2015, the Supreme Court held state bans on same-sex marriage unconstitutional in Obergefell v. Hodges; in June 2018, the Supreme Court ruled in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission that owners of public accommodations can refuse service to gay people on religious grounds. This year, the Court’s decision in Fulton v. City of Philadelphia is expected any day. That ruling will determine whether a Catholic child welfare organization can refuse to recommend gay and lesbian couples as foster parents. Each of these decisions affects whether and how we are legally allowed to enter into familial relationships; each of these decisions feels like a ruling on my humanity.

As a queer librarian, Pride month is especially personal for me, because the archival mission, the mission of organizing and making available resources about LGBTQ+ pride and history, is so urgently necessary to the ongoing formation of my community. As Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick wrote in The Epistemology of the Closet in 1990, in a passage that immediately resonated with me as a young lesbian, gay people are people “who seldom grow up in gay families; who are exposed to their culture’s, if not their parents’, high ambient homophobia long before either they or those who care for them know that they are among those who most urgently need to define themselves against it; who have with difficulty and always belatedly to patch together from fragments a community, a usable heritage, a politics of survival or resistance” (p. 81). Growing up, usually, outside of queer communities, we must work to seek them out. Thus the particular importance of LGBTQ+ community centers, archives, and oral history projects, through which we belatedly learn (and create) a collective history.

This archival impulse is compounded by the monumental loss of gay community to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the immeasurable loss of human lives and collective knowledge. June of 2021 marks the 40th anniversary of the first known cases of the disease that would eventually be known as HIV/AIDS. As government agencies refused to act, LGBTQ+ communities came together to educate each other, care for each other, fight for change, and remember lost loved ones in memorials and works of art. (The struggle for same-sex marriage gained urgency in this crisis as well, as gay couples with no legally recognized relationship were denied the rights to hospital visits or inheritance; Sarah Schulman traces how those legal lacunae shaped the development of New York City in The Gentrification of the Mind.)

I hope that you find in these resources a celebration of LGBTQ+ joy, fabulousness, and community, and an acknowledgment of the work that is left to be done.

Resource Highlights!

Cover ArtThe Gay Metropolis by Charles Kaiser

ISBN: 0802147208
Publication Date: 2019-06-04

Cover ArtTrans Bodies, Trans Selves by Laura Erickson-Schroth (Editor)

ISBN: 9780199325351
Publication Date: 2014-06-10

Cover ArtAnd Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson; Peter Parnell; Henry Cole (Illustrator)

ISBN: 1481446959
Publication Date: 2015-06-02

Alexander Street Press LGBT Studies in Video

Carol (available through June 30)

Upcoming Workshops for Distance Learning

The Queens College Library is offering two workshops to support faculty transitioning to an online environment.

Getting Started with Qwriting

Monday, March 16, 2020 • 3pm–4:30 pm
Rosenthal Library Room 227
Due to popular demand, this is now a virtual workshop hosted on Google Meet
(a link will be sent to registered participants 15 minutes before the start of the workshop)

In this workshop, faculty will learn the bare minimum to create a course site that works. Faculty should bring digital copies of a syllabus and course schedule. They can expect to leave with the basic structure of a working class site. You will not unleash your creativity, and we will not cover anything beyond the basic skills required to convert a syllabus and course schedule into a digital learning environment using QC’s WordPress platform.

Collaborative Annotation

Wednesday, March 18, 2020 • 2pm–3:30 pm
Virtually hosted on Google Meet
(a link will be sent to registered participants 15 minutes before the start of the workshop)

How do you discuss the reading if you can’t meet in person? In this workshop on “Collaborative Annotation,” Emerging Technologies and Digital Scholarship Librarian Leila Walker will show how collaborative annotation tools can help cultivate critical reading habits and develop close reading skills, and indicate where students might need extra guidance to understand the material.

Faculty can expect to leave the workshop with a basic understanding of the tools and a draft lesson plan involving collaborative annotation.

Library Support for Off-site Teaching and Learning

The Queens College Library would like to share some tips for remote access to many of our resources and services. The full guide to our services and other tools for supporting remote research is available here: https://qc-cuny.libguides.com/coronavirus.

Welcome Our New OER Faculty Fellows!

The Queens College Library is pleased to announce the Spring 2020 OER Faculty Fellows! These seventeen fellows represent a wide range of academic disciplines and pedagogical approaches, but they are all committed to developing open educational resources that will improve the educational experience of Queens College students.

Faculty Fellows will help Queens College students succeed by reducing the financial burden of high-cost textbooks and generating high-quality alternatives that are up-to-date, accessible, innovative, and pedagogically responsible. The Queens College Libraries and the Center for Teaching and Learning will help fellows find, create, evaluate, and implement zero-cost and/or open materials for a course that will run in Summer or Fall 2020.

Thanks to a generous grant from the State of New York, OER initiatives at Queens College have saved our students more than $500,000 in the past three years.

For more information on how open educational resources and zero-textbook cost materials help our students, visit the Guide to Open Educational Resources and Zero Textbook Cost Materials.

CFP: OER Faculty Fellowship

The Queens College Libraries and Center for Teaching and Learning welcome applications to the Open Educational Resources Faculty Fellowship, now in its second year.

To apply, visit https://forms.gle/Gj8KyE4Q1UEqhvrG8.

Deadline: September 27

About

Faculty Fellows will help Queens College students succeed by reducing the financial burden of high-cost textbooks and generating high-quality alternatives that are up-to-date, accessible, innovative, and pedagogically responsible.

The Queens College Libraries and Center for Teaching and Learning will help fellows find, create, evaluate, and implement zero-cost and/or open materials for a course that will run in spring 2020.

For more information about how open educational resources help our students, visit https://qc-cuny.libguides.com/oer-ztc.

Fellowship Requirements

Both full-time and part-time faculty are eligible for the fellowship. Applicants must clear their participation with their department chair prior to applying.

Faculty fellows commit to:

  • Actively participating in 4 training workshops in Fall 2019 (October 18, November 1 and 22, and December 6, at noon)
  • Developing a fully OER or ZTC course (materials due January 12, 2020)
  • Teaching at least one section of the OER or ZTC course in Spring 2020
  • Submitting course materials to our institutional repository, CUNY Academic Works.
  • Writing a brief (200-500 word) end-of-fellowship narrative (due June 14, 2020)

Compensation

Fellows will receive $2,500 in recognition of their labor.

Smaller amounts are available to support faculty adopting courses created through the fellowship, or to recognize the labor of student or faculty partners, on a case-by-case basis.

To apply, visit https://forms.gle/Gj8KyE4Q1UEqhvrG8.

Questions? Contact Leila Walker at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu.

OER and Digital Literacy Faculty Fellows

Please join us in welcoming the 2019 OER and Digital Literacy Faculty Fellows! This inaugural cohort and library faculty support team include (from left): Robin Hizme, English; Kristin Hart, Chief Librarian; Hillary Miller, English; Line Augustin Saint-Hilaire, Elementary and Early Childhood Education (EECE); Sheila Sanders, Chemistry and Biochemistry; Karen Ball, Linguistics and Communication Disorders (LCD); Peishi Wang, Educational and Community Programs; Ashraf Shady, Elementary and Early Childhood Education (EECE); Nicola Lucchi, European Languages and Literatures; Jorge Antonio Alves, Political Science; Karina Attar, European Languages and Literatures; Leila Walker, Emerging Technologies and Digital Scholarship Librarian. Not pictured: Larissa Swedell, Anthropology. For more information about this fellowship and seminar series, please visit the Fellowship website.