Fellowship Opportunity for Faculty

The Library welcomes applications for the OER Faculty Fellowship program, now in its fourth year, for the 2021-2022 cohort! Applications are due by December 1, 2021.

Fellows will participate in a four-part seminar series that will guide them through the process of finding, creating, evaluating, and implementing open and/or zero-cost materials for a course that will run in Fall 2022 or Spring 2023. The fellowship carries a $2,000 stipend for the creation of a single-section course.

Fellowship Requirements

Both full-time and part-time faculty are eligible for the fellowship. Applicants are expected to clear their participation with their department chair prior to applying. If you are interested in converting a course with multiple sections from a pricey textbook to a free, open alternative, please contact Leila Walker at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu prior to applying, as an alternative arrangement involving multiple instructors and course leads may be more appropriate than an individual fellowship.

Faculty fellows commit to:

  • Actively participate in an OER fellowship seminar in Fall 2021, which will consist of four units with synchronous and asynchronous elements
  • Develop a fully OER or ZTC course (materials due June 6, 2022)
  • Teach at least one section of the OER or ZTC course in Fall 2022 or Spring 2023
  • Submit course materials to our institutional repository, CUNY Academic Works
  • Write a brief (200-500 word) end-of-fellowship narrative (due June 6, 2022)

Opportunities for Large-Scale Projects

The Library is also interested in partnering with course leads for those courses with multiple sections and high enrollments to develop high-quality course materials at a lower cost. The fellowship would offer training and a $2000 stipend for course leads, as well as a $500 stipend for faculty and adjuncts the first time they teach a section of a course using the zero-textbook-cost materials. We have had several successes with multiple section courses, including the creation of an OER lab manual for Biology under the guidance of Prof. Nathalia Holtzman, and the transition from an expensive homework system to a free, open-source alternative under the guidance of Prof. Chris Hanusa in the Math Department.

More Information

More information about how open educational/zero cost resources support teaching and learning can be found in our Guide to Open Educational Resources and Zero Textbook Cost.

More information about our fellowship program can be found on our OER Faculty Fellowships page!

If faculty have any questions or would like to learn more about OER, they are encouraged to contact our OER coordinator, Dr. Leila Walker, Digital Scholarship Librarian at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu.

Celebrating Diversity: Native American Heritage Month Resources!

Resources for Native American Studies by James Tasato Mellone, Historical Cultural and Social Sciences Librarian

The QC Library celebrates Native American Heritage Month! It is fitting that this commemoration of Native American heritage occurs during Thanksgiving time. As such, we acknowledge that Native American history, culture, and society are intrinsic components of American life. Our recent climate crises have shown how essential it is for all Americans, indeed all of humanity, to adopt the physical and spiritual connections to the land that Native Americans have long held. Native American reverence for the earth is seen across the continent as first peoples advocate for clean water, land, and air.

As the leading advocacy cooperative for Native Americans, the National Congress of American Indians produces a State of Indian Nations report each year, as well as other publications like Tribal Nations and the United States: An Introduction, that can provide a window into current Native American life, including their environmental advocacy. For instance, we can learn that the more than 570 tribal nations of the United States inhabit reservations and trust land areas which encompass about 100 million acres, enough to make Native land equivalent to a fourth largest state in the U. S.

As part of our Native American Studies research guide, our Native American Heritage Month 2021: Resources guide provides a selection of QC ebooks, and links to materials in arts & culture, as well as on history, politics & governance. Here are some highlights!

Queens College Library Acquires Barbara Rosenthal Archives

Headshot of Barbara Rosenthal
Barbara Rosenthal
Photo by Rhys Votano

The archival collection of influential cross-media artist Barbara Rosenthal ’75, “Old Master of New Media,” has been acquired by Queens College CUNY in a combined sale and donation facilitated by a generous patron. The artist’s materials are being organized and transported in stages to the newly renovated Charles and Szilvia Tanenbaum Special Collections and Archives Wing within the Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library.

Born in the Bronx, Barbara Rosenthal—no relation to the library’s namesake—studied at numerous local institutions, including the Arts Students League of New York and New York University, before completing a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. At Queens College, she earned an MFA in painting. In the decades since she graduated, she built up an international career, holding solo exhibitions and residencies across North America and Europe and winning acclaim for her distinctive photography, installations, and performance art.

“Barbara Rosenthal’s lifetime of record-keeping, notes, drafts, versions, and materials for every project in many media, plus household and moment-to-moment life-recording and professional correspondences, holds enormous value for current and future generations of artists and researchers,” said Annie Tummino, Head of Special Collections and Archives. “Her archives are revelatory of the creative process in ways unique among our archival collections.”

Treasures from Special Collections and Archives: First Editions of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain 

By Patricia Reguyal, Archives Assistant 

Tom Sawyer Bookcover

Welcome to the inaugural post of the new monthly series, “Treasures from Special Collections and Archives.” This series will initially feature items from the Rare Books and Print History Collections of the Department of Special Collections and Archives (SCA) but will eventually expand to feature items from other important collections held by the department.  

To inaugurate the series, we are proud to announce that the SCA holds two copies of the first American edition of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. According to Blanck’s Bibliography of American Literature, there have been three printings of the first edition of this American classic. The two copies in the SCA are most likely from different printings because, while they have the same publication date, the two books are paginated differently.  

Tom Sawyer

A nearly fine copy of the first American edition is listed on AbeBooks for $45,000 and very good condition copies are listed for $12,000 to $15,000. The two copies at the SCA have been exposed to moisture and mold but have been professionally cleaned and are now in stable condition, thanks to the generosity of Shirley Klein, a lifelong bibliophile and loyal friend of Queens College. Both have the original blue cloth covers with gold-stamped stars and lovely illustrations. Over the longer term, the department hopes to acquire funding to repair the bindings and small tears in the volumes.  

The first edition of this American classic came out in London first. It was published by Chatto and Windus and came out in June 1876. The American edition, published by the American Publishing Company, came out in December 1876. Between these two official editions, a pirated edition from Canada was published in July 1876. The case of the English edition is covered in red cloth instead of the blue cloth of the American edition and is considered rarer and more valuable. Biblioctopus sold a nearly fine copy for $60,000, and the Bodleian Libraries happily announced in 2012 that their copy, previously uncatalogued because it probably “slipped in the stack shelves,” was found during a move of library collections.   

Tom Sawyer Title Page

Remarkably enough, the original and complete manuscript of the novel, in Twain’s own handwriting and with his various erasures and emendations, has been preserved in the Booth Family Center for Special Collections at Georgetown University. Also called a holographic manuscript, it was the manuscript that Twain submitted for the typesetting of the American first edition and that he seemed to have allowed Elisha P. Bliss, the president of the American Publishing Company at the time, to keep after the publication of his novel. This manuscript was also exhibited at the MOMA in 1937.  

The SCA also has one copy of the first American edition of the other Twain classic, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and a post about that treasure will be forthcoming in this series. All three of Twain’s first editions in the stewardship of the SCA are originally from a Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library Rare Book Collection which had formerly been held on the 6th floor of the library, but had been exposed to moisture and had suffered a mold outbreak. The entire collection was recently cleaned and remediated by a vendor. Head of Special Collections and Archives Annie Tummino wrote about its triumphant return to Rosenthal Library last year.  

The SCA staff is currently busy working to preserve, process, and arrange these marvelous treasures so that they may be used and enjoyed by the Queens College community.  

QC Research Highlights: Local Context

CUNY Academic Works Logo

QC Research Highlights is a monthly blog series featuring work from Queens College (QC) authors in CUNY Academic Works. Fascinating, important research is happening here at QC and we want you to know about it! Sometimes (but not always) this series may feature several works on related topics; other times it will simply feature a few works of interest. 

All the works featured in this series are available to read and download for free from CUNY Academic Works. 


Local Knowledge, Universal (?) Applicability

Welcome to the November edition of QC Research Highlights! This month, I wanted to feature some articles that consider how things learned locally might be of interest both inside and outside that local context – and especially when we are learning about our local context, New York. 

In “Education Faculty as Knowledge Brokers: Competing for Access to New York State Print Media and Policy Influence,” Nakia Gray-Nicolas (Education and Community Programs) and co-authors consider how education researchers can reach a larger public, thus influencing public debates about educational policy and practice. This article focuses specifically on the media in New York State. This article considers the reasons it’s so difficult for academics to get access to the media.  

Communicating in different contexts is important to students as well as faculty. “Workin’ Languages: Who We Are Matters in Our Writing” is a book chapter by Sara Alvarez (English), Amy Wan (English), and Eunjeong Lee (formerly a member of the English department, now at the University of Houston).  In this chapter, Alvarez, Wan, and Lee consider how to ensure that students’ rich linguistic diversity is valued in the writing classroom. The authors suggest strategies for supporting students as they recognize their own work as “language architects” and come to understand that their language strategies are valuable in an academic context. 

We should all be interested in how the built environment of New York affects those who live and work here. Kara Schlichting (History) and coauthor Melanie Kiechle (Virginia Tech) consider how heat and ventilation can post health threats to city dwellers (and New Yorkers specifically) – during COVID, but also long before.  Their article, “Invisible Inequalities: Persistent Health Threats in the Urban Built Environment,” considers the history of health reform in New York City through the lens of environmental inequality, with a reminder to think of cities as collections of people and not just landscapes. This perspective allows for a larger-scale structural look at how urban planning and public health are deeply intertwined. 

Of course, New York is not just a built environment but also a natural one. César Castillo (Biology) worked with coauthors from the New York Botanical Garden and the US Department of Agriculture to describe a plant naturalized to New York in “First Report of Mummenhoffia alliacea (Brassicaceae) for New York.” This report includes information on how to identify this plant – one key is the scent!  

A little further afield, Fred Cadieu (Physics) examines rocky planets in his article “A Consistent Model of Terrestrial Planet Magnetospheres and Rotations in Our Solar System.” In this article, he explains how the presence or absence of magnetospheres has affected the atmospheres and tectonic behavior of the four terrestrial planets of the solar system – Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars – and perhaps exoplanets as well.  

Having taken us from New York all the way into the depths of space, I wish you all a happy and productive November! 

Thanks to all the authors featured here for sharing their work in the repository!


This is one of a series of blog posts featuring faculty publications in CUNY Academic Works. Academic Works is a service of the CUNY Libraries dedicated to collecting and providing access to the research, scholarship, and creative and pedagogical work of the City University of New York. In service to CUNY’s mission as a public university, content in Academic Works is freely available to all. 

If you would like to share your research in Academic Works, please see this guide to Academic Works, or contact Nancy.Foasberg@qc.cuny.edu.  

Stories from the Civil Rights Archives: The Queens College Student Help Project of 1963

Event: Thursday, December 9, 2021, 4 – 5PM EST

Queens College is known for its involvement in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, especially the Mississippi Freedom Summer in 1964. A year earlier, a lesser known, but no less important project took place, when 16 volunteers from the Queens College Student Help Project traveled to Prince Edward County, Virginia to tutor Black children who were shut out of public schools due to massive resistance to desegregation. There, they lent support to a long struggle for equal education dating back to the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision in 1954 and local, student-led activism for better schools.

In this presentation, primary sources from the archives will bring to life this important history, as documented through a year-long oral history initiative made possible by the Freda S. and J. Chester Johnson Civil Rights & Social Justice Archives Fellowship Program at the Queens College Library. Initiators/alumni of the Student Help Project will also join the event for the Q and A.

ANNIE TUMMINO is an assistant professor and head of Special Collections and Archives at the Queens College Library, where she manages over 5,000 linear feet of college records, personal papers, and rare books. She is particularly interested in preserving the social movement history of Queens College and connecting it to today’s activists and students. She received a master’s in library and information studies from Queens College in 2010 and a master’s in maritime studies from SUNY Maritime College in 2020.

VICTORIA FERNANDEZ is the museum coordinator at the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College CUNY, where she helps develop and revise exhibition content, instruct student programming, manage library and archival collections, and facilitate interactions with their Holocaust survivor support group. She graduated from Queens College in 2021 with a dual master’s degree in history and library science (MLS/MA) after receiving a BA in history and political science from the Macaulay Honors College at QC in 2018. She has held several positions within the field of archives, most recently serving as the 2020– 2021 Freda S. and J. Chester Johnson Civil Rights and Social Justice Archives Fellow at the Queens College Department of Special Collections and Archives.

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Advancement

Free Film Screening Series (Queer Cinema at QC): Monster Pies

Please join us for Queer Cinema at QC!

This monthly film screening series continues on Wednesday, October 20th, at 6pm with the film Monster Pies!

When Mike’s English teacher pairs him up for a class assignment on Romeo and Juliet with hot new kid William, Mike can’t believe his luck! As the two spend more and more time working together on a monster movie version of Bard’s classic tale, they soon realize their feelings for one another may be more powerful than either is truly ready for.

This film screening is open to everyone on Zoom, but only the first (50) fully vaccinated Queens College students may join us on campus! Masks are required. Seating will be distanced.

Free registration is required: https://tinyurl.com/MonsterPies

Space is limited.

At home, or on campus, Monster Pies is sure to tug at your heartstrings and haunt you for a long time.

Learn more about LGBTQI+ history by browsing the library’s Queer Collection.

Queer Cinema at QC is made possible because of the generous support of the New York City Council through the office of Daniel Dromm (District 25), the Office of Speaker Corey Johnson, and LaGuardia Community College, in partnership with the Queens College Office of Student Development and Leadership, the Queens College Libraries and The Summit at Queens College. Other sponsors include the Women and Gender Studies Programs at Queens College; the Gender, Love & Sexuality Alliance/GLASA at QC; the QC Arts Club, the CUNY Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives, and the Division of Student Affairs.

Queens College is a proud member of the CUNY LGBTQI+ Consortium.

Upcoming Event: Tools and Tips for Searching, Creating, and Sharing with Open: A Presentation from the QC Library

The Queens College Library is celebrating Open Access Week with a workshop on all things open!  The workshop will be held on Monday, October 25, 12:15-1:30 PM.

We want to introduce you to some helpful tools that can make it easier to locate, use, and create open resources. This year, we’re especially focused on how open resources can help your pedagogy. This is a practical workshop that will introduce you to specific tools and resources, including: 

If you’re interested in using open or public domain works in your class, you may be interested in Annie Tummino’s presentation about locating open archives and the quirky and unexpected ways these items are being repurposed by scholars, artists, and gamers.  You may also want to tune in for James Mellone’s talk on finding and using primary sources. 

If you’d like to know more about the pedagogical benefits of collaborating with your students to build open educational resources, Leila Walker’s workshop on OER-building as pedagogy may be of particular interest. 

If you’re thinking about how you can help your graduate students promote their research – or how you can promote your own! – you should attend Nancy Foasberg’s presentation on scholarly profiles and sharing your work.  

Register for the workshop

The workshop will be held on: 
Monday, October 25 
12:15-1:30 PM 

We hope to see you there! 

Culture Watch: Halloween Update!

All weekend there are virtual games with Brooklyn Virtual Game Night. Charades, trivia, and costumes. Tickets are free but there are limited spots each night.

Friday, October 29 at 9:15pm: Rock band My Morning Jacket will be streaming their live performance from The Alabama Theatre.

Saturday, October 30 from 12-5pm: Socrates Sculpture Park in Astoria hosts a doggie costume contest, as well as pumpkin carving and catapulting! Workshops lead up to the Flight of the Gourds at 2pm.

Saturday, October 30 from 6pm: The Queens Night Market season finale is going to be a Halloween themed blast! Just outside the New York Hall of Science in Corona Park, there will be trick or treating and costume prizes for children starting at 8:30. Entry and entertainment are free but the food vendors there have everything you can imagine, and all about $6 or less. I went for the first time this year, and was disappointed I hadn’t visited sooner!

Sunday, October 31 from 7pm: The Village Halloween Parade is back in Greenwich this year! This year’s theme is “Let’s Play!” It honors children as well as everyone’s inner child. The parade rolls out at 7.

Hello and Happy Autumn! Queen College is starting to buzz and that includes some exciting events from the Kupferberg Center and other departments. All listed events are free and most events are virtual, but there are some in-person options this month! Check back in later this month for some Halloween events!

Music

Sunday, October 10 at 3:00pm: Borough President Richards presents rock band Hollis Brown as part of Queens Live! This rock band was formed by Queens College alumni from Queens. Presented in part with the Kupferberg Center for the Arts, this in person event is free! Fort Totten Park, Cross Island Pkwy between Totten Ave and 15 Rd. 

Monday, October 11 at 8:00pm: Trombone Shorty is hosting Shorty Fest from the legendary New Orleans venue, Tipitinas. Other acts include Galactic and Soul Rebels. New Orleans brass at its best from its home! You can livestream it for free!

Friday, October 15 at 7:30pm: The Queens College Orchestra will be livestreaming their concert from Leshrak Concert Hall in the Aaron Copland School of Music. The program includes Gounod’s Petit Symphonie and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6.

Literature

Tuesday, October 12 at 7:00pm: Join in the conversation with award-winning author and NPR journalist Maria Hinojosa. This is a Hispanic Heritage Month event organized in collaboration with the Latin American and Latino Studies program at Queens College and presented by the Kupferberg Center. This event will be livestreamed and tickets are free. You will have the option to get a Support the Arts Ticket.

Architecture

Ongoing: Archtober is New York City’s yearly celebration of architecture and its profound impact on our lives. Most virtual talks are free which you can filter to on their events page.

Celebrating Diversity: Italian American Heritage Month Highlights

Research Services Librarian Alexandra de Luise, liaison for Italian American Studies, presents highlights from the Italian American Studies Guide.

The month of October has been designated Italian American Heritage month. Although overlapping with Hispanic Heritage month, it was chosen in 1989 by presidential decree to overlap with Columbus Day on October 11th.   For many, it is a time to reflect on Italian Americans’ many contributions and to enrich their understanding through lectures, readings and events.  It is also a time to explore through publications and media outlets the changes and new attitudes felt in the field by this group as they touch on its history, sociology, art, culture and literature. 

For a few years now, Italian American authors have been exploring new directions in their scholarship which can be best understood from watching a recent segment of  Italics (Television for the Italian American Experience a monthly presentation co-produced in collaboration with the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute).  In the video. Queens College Professor and the Dean of the John D. Calandra Institute Anthony Julian Tamburri, as well as Queens College Distinguished Professor of Italian American Studies Dr. Fred Gardaphé, are in conversation with  Calandra’s Director of Academic and Cultural Programs, Dr. Joseph Sciorra, and  York College Professor Dr. Donna Chirico.   As leaders in their fields and from their broad and wide-reaching perspectives, they discuss what they see as a greater emphasis on transnationalism, gender, sexuality, whiteness and colonialism.  Current day scholarship is leaning towards a better understanding of our past, to help explain our emigration, immigration and human experiences.  Here are some books and media productions that bear this out:

Books

Migrant Marketplaces by Elizabeth Zanoni 
Call Number: GT2850 .Z36 2018ISBN: 9780252041655
Publication Date: 2018′ Elizabeth Zanoni provides a cutting-edge comparative look at Italian people and products on the move between 1880 and 1940. Concentrating on foodstuffs–a trade dominated by Italian entrepreneurs in New York and Buenos Aires–Zanoni reveals how consumption of these increasingly global imports affected consumer habits and identities and sparked changing and competing connections between gender, nationality, and ethnicity.’

 Whom We Shall Welcome : Italian Americans and Immigration Reform, 1945-1965 by Battisti, Danielle 
Call Number: onlineISBN: 0823286347
Publication Date: 2019                                                                                                                          ‘Danielle Battisti looks at efforts by Italian American organizations to foster Italian immigration along with the lobbying efforts of Italian Americans to change the quota laws. While Italian Americans (and other white ethnics) had attained virtual political and social equality with many other groups of older-stock Americans by the end of the war, Italians continued to be classified as undesirable immigrants.”

 The Divo and the Duce by Giorgio Bertellini 
Call Number: onlineISBN: 9780520301368
Publication Date: 2019
‘Giorgio Bertellini’s work on Italian-born star Rodolfo Valentino and Italy’s dictator Benito Mussolini shows how their popularity, both political and erotic, largely depended on the efforts of public opinion managers, including publicists, journalists, and even ambassadors. Beyond the democratic celebrations of the Jazz Age, the promotion of their charismatic masculinity through spectacle and press coverage inaugurated the now-familiar convergence of popular celebrity and political authority.  Co-winner of the Italian American Studies 2020 book award.’

Napoli/New York/Hollywood by Giuliana Muscio Call Number: OnlineISBN: 0823279405Publication Date: 2018-10-30‘Napoli/New York/Hollywood is an absorbing investigation of the significant impact that Italian immigrant actors, musicians, and directors–and the southern Italian stage traditions they embodied–have had on the history of Hollywood cinema and American media, from 1895 to the present day. Included are such well-known directors and actors as Francis Coppola and his sister Talia Shire, John Turturro, Nancy Savoca, James Gandolfini, David Chase, Joe Dante, and Annabella Sciorra.’

Featured Media and Websites

i-Italy   ‘A guide to everything Italian in America.” A fascinating bilingual blog/magazine/website of information and video clips, the project of the John D Calandra Italian American Institute.

The Italian Americans.  Well-known series shown on the Public Broadcasting System. With Stanley Tucci, narrator.; Ark Media (Firm) production company.; WETA-TV (Television station : Washington, D.C.) production company. 2014

Italian American Studies Association (formerly American Italian Historical Assn.)  Association devoted to the interdisciplinary study of the culture, history, literature, sociology, psychology, demography, folklore, and politics of Italians in America.

Italics, Television for the Italian American Experience. The Italian American magazine of CUNYTV, the online television program, produced by the John D Calandra Italian American Institute, hosted by Dr. Anthony Julian Tamburri, Dean of the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute.