Processing 2020/21: Community Reflections

Timely, online programming presented by the Queens College Library’s Special Collections and Archives in Collaboration with Queens Memory.

All programs will be livestreamed on https://www.facebook.com/queensmemory– no account login necessary.


Documenting a Pandemic: What We’ve Learned

Tuesday, October 5th from 4:00pm-5:30pm

Members of the Queens Memory Project will discuss lessons from the COVID-19 Project, and how they worked together as a team to incorporate the diverse voices of our borough and campus into the archives during this momentous period in history. Livestreamed on https://www.facebook.com/queensmemory.

Chair: Annie Tummino, Assistant Professor, Head of Special Collections and Archives, Queens College

Panelists:

  • Meral Agish, Queens Memory Community Coordinator;
  • Obden Mondesir, Associate Director of the Barnard Archives and Adjunct Instructor, Queens College Graduate School of Library and Information Studies;
  • Dacia Metes, Queens Public Library Digital Archives Manager;
  • Jo-Ann Wong, Librarian, Queens Public Library, Hunters Point.

Surviving & Thriving: Black and Latinx Faculty, Staff, and Students on Campus

Tuesday, October 19th from 4:00pm-5:30pm

What does it take for Black and Latinx faculty, staff, and students to not only survive but thrive in higher education? Join us for a roundtable discussion and presentation of oral history clips from the archives. Livestreamed on https://www.facebook.com/queensmemory.

Co-sponsored by the Queens College SEEK Program and Black Latinx Faculty Staff Association. 

Chair: Obden Mondesir, Associate Director, Barnard Archives and Adjunct Instructor in the Queens College Graduate School of Library and Information Studies.

Panelists:

  • Norka Blackman-Richards, Director of the Queens College Percy E. Sutton SEEK Program;
  • Marco Navarro, Lecturer in English and Director of The Writing Center, Queens College;
  • Nathaniel Smith, Director of NYC Men Teach at The City University of New York, Queens College.

Art and Archives: Creativity During COVID-19

Tuesday November 16 from 4:00pm-5:30pm

How do art and archives intersect? In this roundtable discussion, member of the Queens College community will discuss creative projects undertaken during COVID-19, and their connections to primary sources and archival repositories. Livestreamed on https://www.facebook.com/queensmemory.

Chair: Annie Tummino, Assistant Professor, Head of Special Collections and Archives, Queens College

Panelists:

  • Edisa Weeks, Director of DELIRIOUS Dances and Acting Chair of the Queens College Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance;
  • Members of the What Will the Neighbors Say? Investigative Theatre Company, Artists-In-Residence at Queens College.

Learn more about Queens College Library’s Special Collections and Archives

The Queens Memory Project is a collaboration of Queens College Library and Queens Public Library.

QC Research Highlights: Queens College and the Pandemic

Welcome to QC Research Highlights!  

QC Research Highlights is a monthly blog series featuring work from Queens College (QC) authors in CUNY Academic Works. Fascinating, important research is happening here at QC and we want you to know about it! Sometimes (but not always) this series may feature several works on related topics; other times it will simply feature a few works of interest. 

All the works featured in this series are available to read and download for free from CUNY Academic Works. 


Queens College and the Pandemic 

In the midst of the long public health emergency of COVID-19, scientists and scholars from all disciplines have done important research to help us better understand both the virus itself and the social effects of the pandemic. CUNY faculty have been very active in these efforts.  

CUNY Academic Works, CUNY’s institutional repository, has a collection highlighting COVID-19 research by CUNY Authors.   

Important research has been carried out across CUNY, but for the purposes of this blog post, I would like to point out some research by Queens College (QC) authors in particular. 

Medicine and Public Health 

John Dennehy (Biology), led a team of researchers developing a protocol to detect COVID-19 in wastewater, which was adopted by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection to monitor the prevalence of COVID in New York City. Aside from John Dennehy, authors credited in these articles included QC graduate and undergraduate students Kristin Cheung, Anna Gao, Sherin Kanoly, Michelle Markman, and Kaung Myat Sun, as well as other researchers from across CUNY. This research was also featured in QC’s Big Ideas series, and the library has created a guide to further resources

Or, you can check out the articles here: 

Hongwei Xu (Sociology) worked with collaborators to study the relationship between the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s and the health behaviors of adults in China. This research has implications for the study of health behavior around COVID. 

Social Effects of the Pandemic 

QC faculty have also examined the social and economic effects of the pandemic.  

Cliff Chen (Education and Community Programs), along with graduate students Elena Byrne, and Tanya Vélez studied the impact of the pandemic on families with children, showing the greater impact of the pandemic on lower-income families and families of color: 

Daisuke Akiba (Division of Education) has written about anti-Asian racism in schools during the pandemic, recommending some steps schools can take to protect Asian-American students. 

The tech industry has profited during the pandemic. ShinJoung Yeo (Media Studies) examined the relationship between tech companies and health care in the context of COVID-19: 

Teaching and Learning during the Pandemic 

Of course, QC faculty have also spent the pandemic teaching.  

Bradley W. Bergey (Secondary Education and Youth Services) addressed remote pedagogy during the pandemic in: 

The library’s own Leila Walker wrote about how remote instruction combines the classroom with more private spaces in: 

Annie Tummino, also of the library, worked with partners at the Queens Public Library to host virtual events on social justice, including a roundtable on xenophobia during COVID-19. Together, they created a poster about this experience: 


This is one of a new series of blog posts featuring faculty publications in CUNY Academic Works. Academic Works is a service of the CUNY Libraries dedicated to collecting and providing access to the research, scholarship, and creative and pedagogical work of the City University of New York. In service to CUNY’s mission as a public university, content in Academic Works is freely available to all. 

If you would like to share your research in Academic Works, please see this guide to Academic Works, or contact Nancy.Foasberg@qc.cuny.edu.  

Faculty Opportunity: OER Fellowships

The Library welcomes applications for the OER Faculty Fellowship program, now in its fourth year, for the 2021-2022 cohort! Applications are due by August 1, 2021.

Fellows will participate in a four-part seminar series that will guide them through the process of finding, creating, evaluating, and implementing open and/or zero-cost materials for a course that will run in Spring or Fall 2022. The fellowship carries a $2000 stipend for the creation of a single-section course.

Fellowship Requirements

Both full-time and part-time faculty are eligible for the fellowship. Applicants are expected to clear their participation with their department chair prior to applying. If you are interested in converting a course with multiple sections from a pricey textbook to a free, open alternative, please contact Leila Walker at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu prior to applying, as an alternative arrangement involving multiple instructors and course leads may be more appropriate than an individual fellowship.

Faculty fellows commit to:

  • Actively participate in an OER fellowship seminar in Fall 2021, which will consist of four units with synchronous and asynchronous elements
  • Develop a fully OER or ZTC course (materials due January 10, 2022)
    Teach at least one section of the OER or ZTC course in Fall 2021 or Spring 2022
  • Submit course materials to our institutional repository, CUNY Academic Works
  • Write a brief (200-500 word) end-of-fellowship narrative (due June 6, 2022)

Opportunities for Large-Scale Projects

The Library is also interested in partnering with course leads for those courses with multiple sections and high enrollments to develop high-quality course materials at a lower cost. The fellowship would offer training and a $2000 stipend for course leads, as well as a $500 stipend for faculty and adjuncts the first time they teach a section of a course using the zero-textbook-cost materials. We have had several successes with multiple section courses, including the creation of an OER lab manual for Biology under the guidance of Prof. Nathalia Holtzman, and the transition from an expensive homework system to a free, open-source alternative under the guidance of Prof. Chris Hanusa in the Math Department.

More Information

More information about how open educational/zero cost resources support teaching and learning can be found in our Guide to Open Educational Resources and Zero Textbook Cost.

More information about our fellowship program can be found on our OER Faculty Fellowships page!

If faculty have any questions or would like to learn more about OER, they are encouraged to contact our OER coordinator, Dr. Leila Walker, Digital Scholarship Librarian at lwalker@qc.cuny.edu.

QC Makerspace Open by Appointment

Calling all QC tinkerers, crafters, re-users, and makers: The QC Makerspace, a hands-on learning lab inside the Benjamin Rosenthal Library, is now OPEN by appointment on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays throughout the Spring semester. Be sure to make an appointment at least a day in advance. After making an appointment, you’ll receive an invitation to campus with information about the QC health screening process. Then come in a build something! 

In the Makerspace you can explore and access equipment you probably won’t have access to elsewhere: 3D printing hardware and software, various hand tools and power tools, electronics components, and digital fashion equipment. 

For more information, check out the QC Makerspace website: http://qcmaker.space/