Upcoming Event: Tools and Tips for Searching, Creating, and Sharing with Open: A Presentation from the QC Library

The Queens College Library is celebrating Open Access Week with a workshop on all things open!  The workshop will be held on Monday, October 25, 12:15-1:30 PM.

We want to introduce you to some helpful tools that can make it easier to locate, use, and create open resources. This year, we’re especially focused on how open resources can help your pedagogy. This is a practical workshop that will introduce you to specific tools and resources, including: 

If you’re interested in using open or public domain works in your class, you may be interested in Annie Tummino’s presentation about locating open archives and the quirky and unexpected ways these items are being repurposed by scholars, artists, and gamers.  You may also want to tune in for James Mellone’s talk on finding and using primary sources. 

If you’d like to know more about the pedagogical benefits of collaborating with your students to build open educational resources, Leila Walker’s workshop on OER-building as pedagogy may be of particular interest. 

If you’re thinking about how you can help your graduate students promote their research – or how you can promote your own! – you should attend Nancy Foasberg’s presentation on scholarly profiles and sharing your work.  

Register for the workshop

The workshop will be held on: 
Monday, October 25 
12:15-1:30 PM 

We hope to see you there! 

QC Research Highlights: Master’s Theses and Capstones at Queens College

This edition of QC Research Highlights features some of the important, fascinating research done by graduate students at Queens College. Academic Works, CUNY’s institutional repository, has a small collection of master’s theses and student capstones completed at Queens College.   This collection is still growing! See below if you’d like to participate. 

Social Sciences 

Thanks to our partnership with the History department, we have been able to add theses showing some of the breadth of this discipline, from anarchist education to the business of baseball to the history of environmentalism and ecofascism.  

Eric Anderson’s thesis, The Anarchist Classroom: A Test of Libertarian Education and Human Nature at the Modern School in New York and New Jersey, 1911-1953, examines the history of radical education in the early twentieth century, specifically in the “Modern School” movement.  

Patrick Spranger writes about the role that gentrification and white flight played in the former Brooklyn Dodgers’ move to Los Angeles in his thesis, Sadness in Brooklyn: The American Housing Act of 1949 and the Brooklyn Dodgers Move to Los Angeles.  

Santiago G. Lozada’s thesis, From Green Pastures to Scorched Earth: German Environmentalism and Ecology, C. 1800S-1945, outlines the history of environmentalism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and its complicated relationship to the rise of Nazism. 

Arts and Humanities 

In his thesis, Sacred Music in Colonial Era Hispaniola: The Evangelization of the Taino PeopleTito Gutierrez discusses how sacred European music became a tool of colonialism and conversion on the island of Hispaniola. 

Natural Sciences 

Finally, we’re delighted to share some of the scientific research being done by Queens College graduate students! Both these theses are in Earth and Environmental Sciences.  

Azlan Maqbool’s thesis, Investigating Distribution of Legionella pneumophila in Urban and Suburban Watersheds, assess the presence of the aforementioned bacteria – the cause of Legionnaire’s Disease – in New York City street water. These bacteria are indeed common in street water and increase in wet weather, and this is the first study to document that. 

Lisa Hlinka studied magma and explosivity in her thesis, Top-Down Control on Eruptive Style at Masaya Volcano Inferred from Melt Composition. Using the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua, Hlinka shows that explosivity is caused not by volatile contents, but pressurization from temporary sealing of the conduit. 

Help our collection grow! 

Thanks to all the authors featured here for sharing their theses in the repository! Thanks, also, to Grace Davie, David Lahti, Emily Wilbourne, and other faculty who have assisted in facilitating student deposits.  

The master’s theses in Academic Works currently represent only a small portion of the important research done by QC graduate students! If you’re interested in sharing your thesis, please see this Guide to Theses and Capstones in Academic Works.   

The library also holds many master’s theses in print. You can search for these works in OneSearch and, once you have the call number, request access by emailing the Borrowing desk

QC Research Highlights: Queens College and the Pandemic

Welcome to QC Research Highlights!  

QC Research Highlights is a monthly blog series featuring work from Queens College (QC) authors in CUNY Academic Works. Fascinating, important research is happening here at QC and we want you to know about it! Sometimes (but not always) this series may feature several works on related topics; other times it will simply feature a few works of interest. 

All the works featured in this series are available to read and download for free from CUNY Academic Works. 


Queens College and the Pandemic 

In the midst of the long public health emergency of COVID-19, scientists and scholars from all disciplines have done important research to help us better understand both the virus itself and the social effects of the pandemic. CUNY faculty have been very active in these efforts.  

CUNY Academic Works, CUNY’s institutional repository, has a collection highlighting COVID-19 research by CUNY Authors.   

Important research has been carried out across CUNY, but for the purposes of this blog post, I would like to point out some research by Queens College (QC) authors in particular. 

Medicine and Public Health 

John Dennehy (Biology), led a team of researchers developing a protocol to detect COVID-19 in wastewater, which was adopted by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection to monitor the prevalence of COVID in New York City. Aside from John Dennehy, authors credited in these articles included QC graduate and undergraduate students Kristin Cheung, Anna Gao, Sherin Kanoly, Michelle Markman, and Kaung Myat Sun, as well as other researchers from across CUNY. This research was also featured in QC’s Big Ideas series, and the library has created a guide to further resources

Or, you can check out the articles here: 

Hongwei Xu (Sociology) worked with collaborators to study the relationship between the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s and the health behaviors of adults in China. This research has implications for the study of health behavior around COVID. 

Social Effects of the Pandemic 

QC faculty have also examined the social and economic effects of the pandemic.  

Cliff Chen (Education and Community Programs), along with graduate students Elena Byrne, and Tanya Vélez studied the impact of the pandemic on families with children, showing the greater impact of the pandemic on lower-income families and families of color: 

Daisuke Akiba (Division of Education) has written about anti-Asian racism in schools during the pandemic, recommending some steps schools can take to protect Asian-American students. 

The tech industry has profited during the pandemic. ShinJoung Yeo (Media Studies) examined the relationship between tech companies and health care in the context of COVID-19: 

Teaching and Learning during the Pandemic 

Of course, QC faculty have also spent the pandemic teaching.  

Bradley W. Bergey (Secondary Education and Youth Services) addressed remote pedagogy during the pandemic in: 

The library’s own Leila Walker wrote about how remote instruction combines the classroom with more private spaces in: 

Annie Tummino, also of the library, worked with partners at the Queens Public Library to host virtual events on social justice, including a roundtable on xenophobia during COVID-19. Together, they created a poster about this experience: 


This is one of a new series of blog posts featuring faculty publications in CUNY Academic Works. Academic Works is a service of the CUNY Libraries dedicated to collecting and providing access to the research, scholarship, and creative and pedagogical work of the City University of New York. In service to CUNY’s mission as a public university, content in Academic Works is freely available to all. 

If you would like to share your research in Academic Works, please see this guide to Academic Works, or contact Nancy.Foasberg@qc.cuny.edu.  

QC Library Hosts Earth Day Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

This Earth Day, please join the QC Library for a climate changed-themed Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon!

No experience editing Wikipedia is needed – We’ll teach you everything you need to know.  If you’ve never edited Wikipedia before, this is your chance! Edit-a-thons provide a fun atmosphere and support from experts as we all work together to add references, expand articles, and improve the world’s biggest encyclopedia. This edit-a-thon will be digital, but Wikipedians and librarians will still be available with support, guidance, and suggested topics. Help ensure that climate issues are well-represented on Wikipedia. If you’re like us, you find yourself consulting Wikipedia on a regular basis! Wikipedia thrives on the participation of its editors; if you’ve ever added a reference or made a correction, no matter how small, you’ve made this resource better for everyone! However, as with most voluntary projects, Wikipedia tends toward systematic bias including corporate, racial, and gender bias, mostly because its editor base is not diverse enough. That’s one reason new editors are so important.

Edit-a-thons are also really fun! We’ll teach you the best strategies for ensuring your edits stick around, walk you through all the things you need to know, and cheerlead for you every step of the way. Bring a friend! While we can’t offer free refreshments in this online format, we can offer support and good company as we edit and create articles on climate change and climate justice. The entire Queens College community is welcome! We’ll be working all week, so please join for as much or as little as your schedule allows.

The Edit-a-Thon will kick off on April 22nd . Register on the Libray’s event page. We will meet in Zoom to introduce the edit-a-thon and get the edits started, but the edit-a-thon will continue through the week on Discord or Slack. We’ll meet again on April 30 to celebrate our work.

If you can’t make the April 22nd event but would still like to participate throughout the week, let us know! Contact Associate Professor Nancy Foasberg.

We hope to see you there!

Featured Resource: Alexander Street Press

If you’re looking for videos, you might want to check out Alexander Street Press!

This huge resource includes videos on all sorts of topics, from astronomy to gastronomy, and many different types of content as well! For instance, it includes:

  • Theatrical, musical and dance performances
  • Documentaries (including PBS documentaries)
  • Interviews
  • Instructional videos
  • Historical newsreels

A “channels” feature allows you to easily locate multiple videos on the same topic. A few examples:

Of course, there is much more!

The database includes some useful features to go with the videos.  Each video includes a transcript to help you navigate through it. Additionally, you can make clips or playlists to share with your class.

-Nancy Foasberg, Scholarly Communications Librarian.